Long days, hot nights, risky business —insuring your seasonal or summer operation

Summer business insurance
One out of three Canadian entrepreneurs is heading into the busy summer season without insurance coverage. This is largely due to misconceptions such as the belief that their operation isn’t big enough to need coverage, that they’re protected by their personal insurance, or that they don’t need it since they run a seasonal business. The dog days of summer are finally here, which means that many of these seasonal businesses are up and running, while other year-round operations are in the thick of their busiest season. This presents a perfect opportunity to illustrate how some popular Canadian and summer-oriented businesses would benefit from insurance.

Long days, hot nights, risky business —insuring your seasonal or summer operation

summer risks infographicPatios:

Patio season in Canada (which basically begins when temperatures reach the double digits) is like a late-night poutine; it doesn’t last very long, but every second of it is amazing. In fact, some of your customers can get so excited about patio season finally arriving that they indulge in a few extra libations. Outdoor seating areas are also more exposed to the elements like rain, which can cause slip and falls, or strong winds that can topple umbrellas onto customers. Coverages like liquor liability and commercial general liability insurance can protect your business from these less exciting aspects of patios so you, and your customers, can focus on all the great ones.

Ice Cream Shops:

There are lots of ways to beat the heat this summer, but none are as delicious as ice cream. Whether your shop is only open during warm months, or if this is your year-round store’s busiest season, making sure you have enough scoops to satisfy everyone’s sweet tooth is crucial to your success. That’s impossible to do if an equipment malfunction or power outage causes a major ice cream meltdown that potentially costs you thousands of dollars. Business interruption insurance can cover you for the earnings you miss out on if this ever was to happen.

Farmer’s market stalls:

Whether it’s baked goods, cheese, crafts or any other specialty product, Canadians understand the value of buying from a local source, as evidenced by the many farmers’ markets that pop up all over the country during summertime. The products may be seasonal and the stalls may be temporary, but if you set up shop at a farmer’s market, you’ll need a lot of the same insurance protection as brick-and-mortar stores. This is partially because your customers can still get a chipped tooth or food poisoning, and your stall can still be damaged by wind gusts and summer storms.  The coverages that would help you in these instances are commercial property insurance and general liability coverage.

Event planners:

August is the busiest wedding month for Canadians—the weather is perfect and couples want their special day to be as well. To help achieve that perfection, they often rely on wedding planners. However, no matter how organized you are when planning a wedding, there’s always a chance you’ll make a mistake—we all do from time to time. While mistakes may affect your event and in turn your clients’ satisfaction, they may not negatively affect your company’s account balances if you’re protected with Errors and Omissions (E&O) insurance.

Landscapers:

Canadian landscapes are a thing of beauty, and not just at national parks either—the  manicured yards that landscaping companies design and build are truly works of art. But you don’t need paintbrushes and canvases to bring this kind of art to life; you need power tools, so make sure yours are protected. It’s not uncommon for tools to be stolen from company trucks parked in front of houses while their crews work in the backyard. A good way to make sure tool theft doesn’t slow down your project is a business property insurance policy. Learn more about insurance for landscapers. Download your own copy of our helpful infographic, and be sure to visit TruShield’s Insurance 101 pages for more information on how these coverages can benefit your business.  This blog is provided for information only and is not a substitute for professional advice. We make no representations or warranties regarding the accuracy or completeness of the information and will not be responsible for any loss arising out of reliance on the information. Terms, conditions, and exclusions apply, see policy for details.